tips for storing medical marijuana properly

Tips to Store Medical Marijuana Properly

    Living on a shoestring medical marijuana budget? Get the most out of it by storing your stash properly. This will help preserve its flavor, potency, and much more. A sandwich bag or plastic pop top bottles are not your storage solutions. If stored improperly, your medical marijuana may dry out quickly, lose flavor, or in the worst of circumstances a mold may grow on your cannabis. So, instead of rendering it dangerous to consume, protect your stash with proper storage solutions.

    These simple tips will help keep your medical marijuana remain fresh, fragrant, and pleasant to consume for years without affecting its potency. A study published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology suggests that cannabinoids present in the cannabis plants can remain stable and safe for consumption for up to 2 years if they are stored properly. Like any other consumable such as wine or food, there are certain parameters you need to adhere to in order to keep the flavor and freshness consistent.

    Here are some tips to store your medical marijuana stash properly:

    • Keep it Out of Direct Sunlight

    Direct sunlight is one of the most essential factors when it comes to marijuana storage. This is due to the fact that the Ultra Violet rays from the Sun break the organic matter over time. This degrades the quality of the cannabis product thereby affecting its potency.

    To protect your marijuana product from the harmful UV rays, experts prefer colored glass containers for storage. They act similar to what sunglasses do for our eyes. Essentially, the colored jars protect the THC resin glands in the product thereby preserving its quality.

    Although, light may take a long time to damage your marijuana product, storing it in a dark place such as a drawer will eliminate any kind of exposure to light. Subsequently, storing it in a jar is useful but if you store it in a dark place, that works well too.

    • Limit Exposure to Oxygen

    The high-grade marijuana that you purchase has already gone through the curing process which involves getting it exposed to Oxygen. This is carefully controlled which helps flowers retain full cannabinoid and terpene content. Once you’ve purchased the flower, the responsibility rests upon your shoulder to make sure that the product does not lose its freshness and potency. For that you must ensure that it is not exposed to oxygen. The solution is discussed in the points below.

    • Ensure the Ideal Humidity

    Conventional wisdom says that the ideal humidity conditions for cannabis storage ranges from 60% to 65%. Dry air can make cannabis less potent and more brittle making it really harsh to smoke. But this does not tend to happen unless you live in a desert. On the contrary, high humid conditions can also hamper the quality of cannabis. It promotes growth of mold which renders it really dangerous to consume. That is why you must not compromise the storage of your marijuana product. Investing in a dehumidifier never goes wrong.

    • Skip Plastic Bags and Go for Airtight Glass Jars

    A lot of medical marijuana patients keep their stash in plastic bags just like they do with other medicines. This affects the freshness of your marijuana supply. The plastic bags let in heat, allow moisture, cause static, and eventually lead to harsh inhales.

    Rather get airtight glass jars. Not only do they protect from the flower to get exposed to heat, light, air, it also limits exposure to oxygen. Make sure when you pack your product in jars to leave a little room for your flower to breathe. Get a glass jar dark enough to filter out light and sturdy enough to withstand an occasional drop.

    Final Thoughts

    Considering the above reasons, the ideal location to store your marijuana is in a cellar which is a dark, dry, and cold place. This way you can protect your stash from getting exposed to light, moisture, heat, and oxygen.

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